India's largest store for 3D Printers, 3D Printing Services

3D PRINTING NEWS taiwan-researchers-3d-print-magnesium-battery-three-times-more-powerful-than-lithium-nickel-batteries-1

Published on September 4th, 2016 | by Geetika Bhasin

3D Printed High-Capacity Magnesium Batteries Developed by Taiwan Researchers

Some time back Irish Researchers were awarded an ERC grant to 3D printed nano batteries. Now Taiwan researchers at the National Cheng Kung University have gone a step further and printed a Magnesium battery. It is smaller than standard size batteries and 3 times more efficient than nickel or lithium ones. It can be printed in just a few minutes, gets speedily charged and has a high amount of power.

Department of Materials professors Hong Feiyi and LvChuan Sheng have designed these batteries. These were developed for use in electric cars and motorcycles as the batteries used in these vehicles are heavy and difficult to develop. 3D printing enhances the process by completely reversing the production process. Electric car batteries are currently produced in 24 hours by processes namely, powder synthesis, adding powder binder and stirring it in, powder coating and pressing, and baking.

3D printing simplifies the steps involved. The last 3 processes are combined into a single processing step. And therefore battery production by 3D printing involves two basic steps of powder synthesis and 3D printing. The entire process takes just three minutes and the laser fusion processes give an extra metallic layer to the battery which increases the power capacity and durability of the battery.

The 3D printing process could change the basis of battery production and give rise to the development of custom batteries. Moreover, the magnesium powder used in the battery increases the battery power.

Magnesium batteries have a power of 6000mAh/g rather than the capacity of the nonmagnesium batteries which is 5000mAh/g. 3D printing can be now used for the mass production of 3D printed magnesium batteries which have much more power and can be charged speedily.

The Taiwan researchers are collaborating with the ITRI South Branch and Dr. Huang Weiqin of a laminated laser manufacturing technology center to bring these batteries into the market.



About the Author

Profile photo of Geetika Bhasin

Back to Top ↑